Quoted: CorpComms Magazine ‘Why employees now rule’

In this article Andrew Cave considers why the old top-down command and control doesn’t work anymore.

Andrew starts with the observation that “Ten years ago, some WAGs probably saw employee engagement as denoting the number of workers with rings on their fingers. Now it is one of the most popular buzzphrases in corporate communications, with 48 per cent of respondents in the survey CorpComms Magazine ran to commemorate our 100th issue saying this responsibility had fallen under their remit over the previous decade.”

Employee engagement is now top of corporate agendas.

Yet what does this latest piece of corporate jargon really mean?

Where did it come from, where is it going and what are the best method of actually achieving it?

The article shares the perspectives from the experts who have set the way, including Brenda McWilliams-Piatek, Managing Director of Brand and Communications at FedEx Europe, Stephen Duncan, Head of Employee Engagement EMEA at Weber Shandwick, Rachel Miller, All things IC, and our own Isabel Collins.

“Isabel Collins, Founder of consultancy Belonging Space, sees the emphasis moving to culture, values and a sense of belonging. ‘Belonging is the 21st Century challenge and the reason that culture can make or break a business,’ she says. ‘A lot of the corporate challenges that come up are very much related to what people feel they belong to. Culture informs devision-making at an intuitive level. People make decisions in certain ways because it’s how they do things.

‘It’s a problem with integrating mergers and acquisitions and also with silos within organisations. Humans identify with small groups that appear to be similar to us but what we struggle doing is belonging to several tribes at one time. 21st Century life and business requires us to do that.’

What there’s consensus about is that employee engagement is far from easy.”

You can see the full article at the link below
http://www.corpcommsmagazine.co.uk/features/3933-why-employees-now-rule